April 15, 2013
'The Soul Nebula houses several open clusters of stars, a large radio source known as W5, and huge evacuated bubbles formed by the winds of young massive stars. Located about 6,500 light years away, the Soul Nebula spans about 100 light years and is usually imaged next to its celestial neighbor the Heart Nebula (IC 1805). The above image appears mostly red due to the emission of a specific color of light emitted by excited hydrogen gas.'
Nasa image of the day: 'IC 1848: The Soul Nebula' by Bob Andersson
If you are going to look at one extra-large-image today, make it this one.

'The Soul Nebula houses several open clusters of stars, a large radio source known as W5, and huge evacuated bubbles formed by the winds of young massive stars. Located about 6,500 light years away, the Soul Nebula spans about 100 light years and is usually imaged next to its celestial neighbor the Heart Nebula (IC 1805). The above image appears mostly red due to the emission of a specific color of light emitted by excited hydrogen gas.'

Nasa image of the day'IC 1848: The Soul Nebula' by Bob Andersson

If you are going to look at one extra-large-image today, make it this one.

February 28, 2013
bedroomwindow:
Sergei Burtsev, 41, a meteorologist, prepares to launch a weather balloon in the village of Tomtor, on January 30, 2013. (Reuters/Maxim Shemetov)

bedroomwindow:

Sergei Burtsev, 41, a meteorologist, prepares to launch a weather balloon in the village of Tomtor, on January 30, 2013. (Reuters/Maxim Shemetov)

February 11, 2013
'The remains of the heat shield that protected the rover from temperatures of up to 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit as it made its way through the martian atmosphere. This two-frame mosaic was taken on the rover's 335th martian day, or sol, (January 2, 2005). The view is of the main heat shield debris seen from approximately 10 meters (about 33 feet) away from it. Many rover-team engineers were taken aback when they realized the heat shield had inverted, or turned itself inside out.' (NASA/JPL/Cornell)

'The remains of the heat shield that protected the rover from temperatures of up to 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit as it made its way through the martian atmosphere. This two-frame mosaic was taken on the rover's 335th martian day, or sol, (January 2, 2005). The view is of the main heat shield debris seen from approximately 10 meters (about 33 feet) away from it. Many rover-team engineers were taken aback when they realized the heat shield had inverted, or turned itself inside out.' (NASA/JPL/Cornell)

February 11, 2013
'This image taken by the panoramic camera onboard Opportunity shows the rover's now-empty lander, the Challenger Memorial Station, at Meridiani Planum, Mars, on February 27, 2004.' (NASA/JPL/Cornell)

'This image taken by the panoramic camera onboard Opportunity shows the rover's now-empty lander, the Challenger Memorial Station, at Meridiani Planum, Mars, on February 27, 2004.' (NASA/JPL/Cornell)

January 23, 2013
A miscellany of beautiful sea-creature things from the Voyage de la Corvette (an Atlas from 1833)

A miscellany of beautiful sea-creature things from the Voyage de la Corvette (an Atlas from 1833)

January 23, 2013
'The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, under construction. ALMA will be initially composed of 66 antennas, consisting a main array of fifty 12-meter antennas that can be spread over distances from 150 metres to 16 kilometers. In addition to the main array, ALMA will also have a compact array, composed of four 12-meter antennas plus twelve 7-meter antennas. By using the technique of interferometry, ALMA will work as a single giant telescope, enabling astronomers to observe the cold universe with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO/W. Garnier)’

'The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, under construction. ALMA will be initially composed of 66 antennas, consisting a main array of fifty 12-meter antennas that can be spread over distances from 150 metres to 16 kilometers. In addition to the main array, ALMA will also have a compact array, composed of four 12-meter antennas plus twelve 7-meter antennas. By using the technique of interferometry, ALMA will work as a single giant telescope, enabling astronomers to observe the cold universe with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO/W. Garnier)

January 23, 2013
'A color composite of visible and near-infrared images of the dark cloud Barnard 68. It was obtained with the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope and the multimode FORS1 instrument in March 1999. At these wavelengths, the small cloud is completely opaque because of the obscuring effect of dust particles in its interior' (ESO)

'A color composite of visible and near-infrared images of the dark cloud Barnard 68. It was obtained with the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope and the multimode FORS1 instrument in March 1999. At these wavelengths, the small cloud is completely opaque because of the obscuring effect of dust particles in its interior' (ESO)

January 23, 2013
'The KMOS spectrograph, shown when it was undergoing tests at the UK Astronomy Technology Center in Edinburgh, before it was shipped to Chile to become a powerful new instrument on the VLT. The 24 robotic arms are visible. (STFC/UKATC/ESO)’

'The KMOS spectrograph, shown when it was undergoing tests at the UK Astronomy Technology Center in Edinburgh, before it was shipped to Chile to become a powerful new instrument on the VLT. The 24 robotic arms are visible. (STFC/UKATC/ESO)

December 11, 2012
"nebula is V380 Orionis and the entire complex is just south of the much more famous Orion Nebula. V380 Orionis is a very young (variable) star" source

"nebula is V380 Orionis and the entire complex is just south of the much more famous Orion Nebula. V380 Orionis is a very young (variable) star" source

December 11, 2012
NGC 1999, a dust-filled bright nebula surrounding a vast hole of empty space in the constellation Orion. Hubble Heritage astronomers, in collaboration with scientists in Texas and Ireland, used Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 to obtain this color image. (NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team STScI)

NGC 1999, a dust-filled bright nebula surrounding a vast hole of empty space in the constellation Orion. Hubble Heritage astronomers, in collaboration with scientists in Texas and Ireland, used Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 to obtain this color image. (NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team STScI)

November 26, 2012
Dark Sand Cascades on Mars, image taken in 2008 April near the North Pole of Mars
source

Dark Sand Cascades on Mars, image taken in 2008 April near the North Pole of Mars

source

October 15, 2012

(Source: diamonds-wood)

October 10, 2012
Nacreous clouds, observed on January 6, 2011. These polar stratospheric clouds at 80,000 feet are the highest of all clouds. They only occur in the polar regions when the stratospheric temperature dips below 100 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (-73 C). They are also the site of chemical reactions that break down ozone in the upper atmosphere and contribute to the creation of the ozone hole above Antarctica. (National Science Foundation/Kelly Speelman) Scenes From Antartica

Nacreous clouds, observed on January 6, 2011. These polar stratospheric clouds at 80,000 feet are the highest of all clouds. They only occur in the polar regions when the stratospheric temperature dips below 100 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (-73 C). They are also the site of chemical reactions that break down ozone in the upper atmosphere and contribute to the creation of the ozone hole above Antarctica. (National Science Foundation/Kelly Speelman) Scenes From Antartica

October 10, 2012
Construction crew members stand in front of the South Pole Telescope (SPT). Joshua Miller, Ryan Kunz, John R. Mallon III, Chris Kendal and Eric Nichols assembled the ground shield (the ‘squarish’ outer rim) around the 10-meter parabolic dish during the 2011-12 austral summer. The shield will help prevent ground reflection interference. The SPT is examining Cosmic Microwave Background and Dark Matter. Photo taken on January 11, 2012. (National Science Foundation/John Mallon III) Scenes from Antartica

Construction crew members stand in front of the South Pole Telescope (SPT). Joshua Miller, Ryan Kunz, John R. Mallon III, Chris Kendal and Eric Nichols assembled the ground shield (the ‘squarish’ outer rim) around the 10-meter parabolic dish during the 2011-12 austral summer. The shield will help prevent ground reflection interference. The SPT is examining Cosmic Microwave Background and Dark Matter. Photo taken on January 11, 2012. (National Science Foundation/John Mallon III) Scenes from Antartica

September 1, 2012
Neuroanatomical atlas illustration plates from the 1786 ‘Traité d’Anatomie et de Physiologie’ by Félix Vicq D’Azyr more

Neuroanatomical atlas illustration plates from the 1786 ‘Traité d’Anatomie et de Physiologie’ by Félix Vicq D’Azyr more